Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/measured/public_html/blog/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress.php on line 250

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/measured/public_html/blog/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress.php on line 649

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/measured/public_html/blog/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress.php on line 2699

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/measured/public_html/blog/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress.php on line 2763
measured-response
Blog15 Apr 2008 03:40 pm

Kellar, I. Sutton, S., Griffin, S. Prevost, A.T., Kinmonth, A.L., & Marteau, T.M. (in press) Evaluation of an informed choice invitation for type 2 diabetes screening. Patient Education & Counselling.

Just got accepted without further revisions

Here’s the copy that was accepted - click here.

Blog17 Jun 2007 12:11 pm
Blog02 May 2007 01:44 pm
Blog26 Apr 2007 10:23 am
Blog29 Mar 2007 09:39 pm
Blog29 Mar 2007 09:08 am
Blog21 Mar 2007 09:53 am
Blog25 Feb 2007 08:26 am
Blog02 Jan 2007 12:42 pm
Blog27 Dec 2006 02:33 pm
Blog15 Dec 2006 03:05 pm
Blog13 Nov 2006 10:50 pm
Health Psychology06 Nov 2006 12:37 pm

39 new PubMed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

theory[All Fields] AND planned[All Fields] AND behavio*[All Fields]

These PubMed results were generated on 2006/11/06

PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine, includes over 15 million citations for biomedical articles back to the 1950's. These citations are from MEDLINE and additional life science journals. PubMed includes links to many sites providing full text articles and other related resources.

Health Psychology and Social Cognition and Volitional Processes06 Nov 2006 12:37 pm
Related Articles

Improving fruit and vegetable consumption: a self-efficacy intervention compared with a combined self-efficacy and planning intervention.

Health Educ Res. 2006 Oct 23;

Authors: Luszczynska A, Tryburcy M, Schwarzer R

Effects of interventions targeting self-efficacy alone or combined with action plans were examined in the context of fruit and vegetable consumption. E-mail messages were sent to a self-efficacy group, a combined self-efficacy and action planning group and a control group. At a 6-month follow-up, 200 adults reported their fruit and vegetable consumption, along with current levels of self-efficacy and planning. The two experimental groups gained equally from the interventions, as documented by changes in behavior. In both intervention groups, change in respective cognitions predicted change in fruit and vegetable consumption. Parsimonious interventions might contribute to health behavior change.

PMID: 17060349 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Health Psychology and Social Cognition and Volitional Processes06 Nov 2006 12:37 pm
Related Articles

Support provider's appraisal detection bias and the efficacy of received support in medical students preparing for an exam.

Br J Soc Psychol. 2006 Sep;45(Pt 3):599-615

Authors: Knoll N, Schulz U, Schwarzer R, Rosemeier HP

Matching social support to the recipient's needs requires diagnostic sensitivity on the part of the provider. In particular, support needs to be responsive to the recipient's stress-related appraisals to be maximally effective. To assess the impact of bias in interpersonal stress assessment, medical students in 43 dyads reported on their own and each other's stress appraisals, social support, affect and performance during a 5-day preparation period culminating in a multiple choice examination. Less biased perceptions of loss appraisals by support providers within dyads were followed by support transactions associated with lower negative affect and better exam performance among recipients. More biased perceptions of threat appraisals were followed by increases in the recipients' negative affect. Results therefore suggest that support is more effective when the provider understands the recipient's concerns.

PMID: 16984723 [PubMed - in process]

Next Page »